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README.md

XTS

Introduction

The X test suite (XTS) subsystem contains a set of OpenHarmony certification test suites, including the currently supported application compatibility test suite (ACTS) and the device compatibility test suite (DCTS) that will be supported in the future.

This subsystem contains the ACTS and tools software package.

  • The acts directory stores the source code and configuration files of ACTS test cases. The ACTS helps device vendors detect the software incompatibility as early as possible and ensures that the software is compatible to OpenHarmony during the entire development process.
  • The tools software package stores the test case development framework related to acts.

System Types

OpenHarmony supports the following system types:

  • Mini system

    A mini system runs on the devices whose memory is greater than or equal to 128 KiB and that are equipped with MCU processors such as ARM Cortex-M and 32-bit RISC-V. This system provides multiple lightweight network protocols and graphics frameworks, and a wide range of read/write components for the IoT bus. Typical products include connection modules, sensors, and wearables for smart home.

  • Small system

    A small system runs on the devices whose memory is greater than or equal to 1 MiB and that are equipped with application processors such as ARM Cortex-A. This system provides higher security capabilities, standard graphics frameworks, and video encoding and decoding capabilities. Typical products include smart home IP cameras, electronic cat eyes, and routers, and event data recorders (EDRs) for smart travel.

  • Standard system

    A standard system runs on the devices whose memory is greater than or equal to 128 MiB and that are equipped with application processors such as ARM Cortex-A. This system provides a complete application framework supporting the enhanced interaction, 3D GPU, hardware composer, diverse components, and rich animations. This system applies to high-end refrigerator displays.

Directory Structure

/test/xts
├── acts                # Test code
│   └── subsystem       # Source code of subsystem test cases for the standard system
│   └── subsystem_lite  # Source code of subsystems test cases for mini and small systems
│   └── BUILD.gn        # Build configuration of test cases for the standard system
│   └── build_lite      
│       └── BUILD.gn    # Build configuration of test cases for mini and small systems
└── tools               # Test tool code

Constraints

Test cases for the mini system must be developed based on C, and those for the small system must be developed based on C++.

Usage Guidelines

Table 1 Test case levels

Level

Definition

Scope

Level0

Smoke

Verifies basic functionalities of key features and basic DFX attributes with the most common input. The pass result indicates that the features are runnable.

Level1

Basic

Verifies basic functionalities of key features and basic DFX attributes with common input. The pass result indicates that the features are testable.

Level2

Major

Verifies basic functionalities of key features and basic DFX attributes with common input and errors. The pass result indicates that the features are functional and ready for beta testing.

Level3

Regular

Verifies functionalities of all key features, and all DFX attributes with common and uncommon input combinations or normal and abnormal preset conditions.

Level4

Rare

Verifies functionalities of key features under extremely abnormal presets and uncommon input combinations.

Table 2 Test case granularities

Test Scale

Test Objects

Test Environment

LargeTest

Service functionalities, all-scenario features, and mechanical power environment (MPE) and scenario-level DFX

Devices close to real devices

MediumTest

Modules, subsystem functionalities after module integration, and DFX

Single device that is actually used. You can perform message simulation, but do not mock functions.

SmallTest

Modules, classes, and functions

Local PC. Use a large number of mocks to replace dependencies with other modules.

Table 3 Test types

Type

Definition

Function

Tests the correctness of both service and platform functionalities provided by the tested object for end users or developers.

Performance

Tests the processing capability of the tested object under specific preset conditions and load models. The processing capability is measured by the service volume that can be processed in a unit time, for example, call per second, frame per second, or event processing volume per second.

Power

Tests the power consumption of the tested object in a certain period of time under specific preset conditions and load models.

Reliability

Tests the service performance of the tested object under common and uncommon input conditions, or specified service volume pressure and long-term continuous running pressure. The test covers stability, pressure handling, fault injection, and Monkey test times.

Security

  • Tests the capability of defending against security threats, including but not limited to unauthorized access, use, disclosure, damage, modification, and destruction, to ensure information confidentiality, integrity, and availability.
  • Tests the privacy protection capability to ensure that the collection, use, retention, disclosure, and disposal of users' private data comply with laws and regulations.
  • Tests the compliance with various security specifications, such as security design, security requirements, and security certification of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT).

Global

Tests the internationalized data and localization capabilities of the tested object, including multi-language display, various input/output habits, time formats, and regional features, such as currency, time, and culture taboos.

Compatibility

  • Tests backward compatibility of an application with its own data, the forward and backward compatibility with the system, and the compatibility with different user data, such as audio file content of the player and smart SMS messages.
  • Tests system backward compatibility with its own data and the compatibility of common applications in the ecosystem.
  • Tests software compatibility with related hardware.

User

Tests user experience of the object in real user scenarios. All conclusions and comments should come from the users, which are all subjective evaluation in this case.

Standard

Tests the compliance with industry and company-specific standards, protocols, and specifications. The standards here do not include any security standards that should be classified into the security test.

Safety

Tests the safety property of the tested object to avoid possible hazards to personal safety, health, and the object itself.

Resilience

Tests the resilience property of the tested object to ensure that it can withstand and maintain the defined running status (including downgrading) when being attacked, and recover from and adapt defense to the attacks to approach mission assurance.

Test Case Development Guidelines

You should select the appropriate programming language and your target test framework to develop test cases.

Table 4 Test frameworks and test case languages for different systems

System

Test Framework

Language

Mini

HCTest

C

Small

HCPPTest

C++

Standard

HJSUnit and HCPPTest

JavaScript and C++

C-based Test Case Development and Compilation (for the Mini System)

Developing test cases for the mini system

The HCTest framework is used to support test cases developed with the C language. HCTest is enhanced and adapted based on the open-source test framework Unity.

  1. Access the test/xts/acts repository where the test cases will be stored.

    ├── acts
    │ └──subsystem_lite
    │ │ └── module_hal
    │ │ │ └── BUILD.gn
    │ │ │ └── src
    │ └──build_lite
    │ │ └── BUILD.gn
  2. Write the test case in the src directory.

    1 Import the test framework header file.

    #include "hctest.h"
    1. Use the LITE_TEST_SUIT macro to define names of the subsystem, module, and test suite.
    /**  
    * @brief  Registers a test suite named IntTestSuite.
    * @param  test Subsystem name
    * @param  example Module name
    * @param  IntTestSuite Test suite name
    */
    LITE_TEST_SUIT(test, example, IntTestSuite);
    1. Define Setup and TearDown.

    Format: Test suite name+Setup, Test suite name+TearDown.

    The Setup and TearDown functions must exist, but function bodies can be empty.

    1. Use the LITE_TEST_CASE macro to write the test case.

    Three parameters are involved: test suite name, test case name, and test case properties (including type, granularity, and level).

    LITE_TEST_CASE(IntTestSuite, TestCase001, Function | MediumTest | Level1) 
    {  
      // Do something 
    };
    1. Use the RUN_TEST_SUITE macro to register the test suite.
    RUN_TEST_SUITE(IntTestSuite);
  3. Create the configuration file (BUILD.gn) of the test module.

    Create a BUILD.gn (example) build file in each test module directory. Specify the name of the built static library and its dependent header file and library in the build file. The format is as follows:

    import("//test/xts/tools/lite/build/suite_lite.gni")
    hctest_suite("ActsDemoTest") {
        suite_name = "acts"
        sources = [
            "src/test_demo.c",
        ]
        include_dirs = [ ]
        cflags = [ "-Wno-error" ]
    }
  4. Add build options to the BUILD.gn file in the acts directory.

    You need to add the test module to the test/xts/acts/build_lite/BUILD.gn script in the acts directory.

    lite_component("acts") {  
        ...
        if(board_name == "liteos_m") {
            features += [    
                ...
                "//xts/acts/subsystem_lite/module_hal:ActsDemoTest"
            ]    
        }
    }
  5. Run build commands.

    Test suites are built along with version build. The ACTS is built together with the debug version.

    NOTE: The ACTS build middleware is a static library, which will be linked to the image.

C-based Test Case Execution (for the Mini System)

Executing test cases for the mini system

Burn the image into the development board.

Executing the test

  1. Use a serial port tool to log in to the development board and save information about the serial port.
  2. Restart the device and view serial port logs.

Analyzing the test result

View the serial port logs, whose format is as follows:

The log for each test suite starts with Start to run test suite: and ends with xx Tests xx Failures xx Ignored.

C++-based Test Case Development and Compilation (for Standard and Small Systems)

Developing test cases for small-system devices (For examples of the standard system, go to the global/i18n_standard directory.)

The HCPPTest framework is enhanced and adapted based on the open-source framework Googletest.

  1. Access the test/xts/acts repository where the test cases will be stored.

    ├── acts
    │ └──subsystem_lite
    │ │ └── module_posix
    │ │ │ └── BUILD.gn
    │ │ │ └── src
    │ └──build_lite
    │ │ └── BUILD.gn
  2. Write the test case in the src directory.

    1. Import the test framework header file.

    The following statement includes gtest.h.

    #include "gtest/gtest.h"
    1. Define Setup and TearDown.
    using namespace std;
    using namespace testing::ext;
    class TestSuite: public testing::Test {
    protected:
    // Preset action of the test suite, which is executed before the first test case
    static void SetUpTestCase(void){
    }
    // Test suite cleanup action, which is executed after the last test case
    static void TearDownTestCase(void){
    }
    // Preset action of the test case
    virtual void SetUp()
    {
    }
    // Cleanup action of the test case
    virtual void TearDown()
    {
    }
    };
    1. Use the HWTEST or HWTEST_F macro to write the test case.

    HWTEST: definition of common test cases, including the test suite name, test case name, and case annotation.

    HWTEST_F: definition of SetUp and TearDown test cases, including the test suite name, test case name, and case annotation.

    Three parameters are involved: test suite name, test case name, and test case properties (including type, granularity, and level).

    HWTEST_F(TestSuite, TestCase_0001, Function | MediumTest | Level1) {
    // Do something
    }
  3. Create a configuration file (BUILD.gn) of the test module.

    Create a BUILD.gn build file in each test module directory. Specify the name of the built static library and its dependent header file and library in the build file. Each test module is independently built into a .bin executable file, which can be directly pushed to the development board for testing.

    Example:

    import("//test/xts/tools/lite/build/suite_lite.gni")
    hcpptest_suite("ActsDemoTest") {
        suite_name = "acts"
        sources = [
            "src/TestDemo.cpp"
        ]
    
        include_dirs = [
            "src",
            ...
        ]
        deps = [
            ...
        ]
        cflags = [ "-Wno-error" ]
    }
  4. Add build options to the BUILD.gn file in the acts directory.

    Add the test module to the test/xts/acts/build_lite/BUILD.gn script in the acts directory.

     lite_component("acts") {  
    ...
    else if(board_name == "liteos_a") {
            features += [
                ...
                "//xts/acts/subsystem_lite/module_posix:ActsDemoTest"
            ]
        }
    }
  5. Run build commands.

    Test suites are built along with the version build. The ACTS is built together with the debug version.

    NOTE: The ACTS for the small system is independently built to an executable file (.bin) and archived in the suites\acts directory of the build result.

C++-based Test Case Execution (for Standard and Small Systems)

Executing test cases for the small system

Currently, test cases are shared by the NFS and mounted to the development board for execution.

Setting up the environment

  1. Use a network cable or wireless network to connect the development board to your PC.

  2. Configure the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway for the development board. Ensure that the development board and the PC are in the same network segment.

  3. Install and register the NFS server on the PC and start the NFS service.

  4. Run the mount command for the development board to ensure that the development board can access NFS shared files on the PC.

    Format: mount NFS server IP address:/NFS shared directory /development board directory nfs

    Example:

    mount 192.168.1.10:/nfs /nfs nfs

Executing test cases

Execute ActsDemoTest.bin to trigger test case execution, and analyze serial port logs generated after the execution is complete.

JavaScript-based Test Case Development (for the Standard System)

The HJSUnit framework is used to support automated test of OpenHarmony apps that are developed using the JavaScript language based on the JS application framework.

Basic syntax of test cases

The test cases are developed with the JavaScript language and must meet the programming specifications of the language.

Table 5

Syntax

Description

Mandatory

beforeAll

Presets a test-suite-level action executed only once before all test cases are executed. You can pass the action function as the only parameter.

No

afterAll

Presets a test-suite-level clear action executed only once after all test cases are executed. You can pass the clear function as the only parameter.

No

beforeEach

Presets a test-case-level action executed before each test case is executed. The number of execution times is the same as the number of test cases defined by it. You can pass the action function as the only parameter.

No

afterEach

Presets a test-case-level clear action executed after each test case is executed. The number of execution times is the same as the number of test cases defined by it. You can pass the clear function as the only parameter.

No

describe

Defines a test suite. You can pass two parameters: test suite name and test suite function. The describe statement supports nesting. You can use beforeall, beforeEach, afterEach, and afterAll in each describe statement.

Yes

it

Defines a test case. You can pass three parameters: test case name, filter parameter, and test case function.

Usage of the filter parameter:

The value of the filter parameter is a 32-bit integer. Setting different bits to 1 means different configurations:

  • bit 0: whether the filter parameter takes effect. 1 means that the test case is used for the function test and other settings of the parameter do not take effect.
  • Bits 0-10: test case categories
  • Bits 16-18: test case scales
  • Bits 24-28: test levels

Test case categories: Bits 0-10 indicate FUNCTION (function test), PERFORMANCE (performance test), POWER (power consumption test), RELIABILITY (reliability test), SECURITY (security compliance test), GLOBAL (integrity test), COMPATIBILITY (compatibility test), USER (user test), STANDARD (standard test), SAFETY (security feature test), and RESILIENCE (resilience test), respectively.

Test case scales: Bits 16-18 indicate SMALL (small-scale test), MEDIUM (medium-scale test), and LARGE (large-scale test), respectively.

Test levels: Bits 24-28 indicate LEVEL0 (level-0 test), LEVEL1 (level-1 test), LEVEL2 (level-2 test), LEVEL3 (level-3 test), and LEVEL4 (level-4 test), respectively.

Yes

Use the standard syntax of Jasmine to write test cases. The ES6 specification is supported.

  1. Store the test cases in the entry/src/main/js/test directory, whose structure is as follows:

    ├── BUILD.gn   
    │ └──entry
    │ │ └──src
    │ │ │ └──main
    │ │ │ │ └──js
    │ │ │ │ │ └──default               
    │ │ │ │ │ │ └──pages
    │ │ │ │ │ │ │ └──index             
    │ │ │ │ │ │ │ │ └──index.js        # Entry file
     │ │ │ │ │ └──test                  # Test code
    │ │ │ └── resources                # HAP resources
    │ │ │ └── config.json              # HAP configuration file
  2. Start the JS test framework and load test cases. The following is an example for index.js.

    // Start the JS test framework and load test cases.
    import {Core, ExpectExtend} from 'deccjsunit/index'
    
    export default {
        data: {
            title: ""
        },
        onInit() {
            this.title = this.$t('strings.world');
        },
        onShow() {
            console.info('onShow finish')
            const core = Core.getInstance()
            const expectExtend = new ExpectExtend({
                'id': 'extend'
            })
            core.addService('expect', expectExtend)
            core.init()
            const configService = core.getDefaultService('config')
            configService.setConfig(this)
            require('../../../test/List.test')
            core.execute()
        },
        onReady() {
        },
    }
  3. Write a unit test case by referring to the following example:

    // Use HJSUnit to perform the unit test.
    describe('appInfoTest', function () {    
        it('app_info_test_001', 0, function () {
            var info = app.getInfo()
            expect(info.versionName).assertEqual('1.0')
            expect(info.versionCode).assertEqual('3')
        })
    }) 

JavaScript-based Test Case Packaging (for the Standard System)

For details about how to build a HAP, see the JS application development guide of the standard system Building and Creating HAPs.

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